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by the federal open market committee to support the economy. in addition, i will discuss important economic challenges our country faces as we close out 2012 and move into 2013, in particular the challenge of putting federal government finances on a sustainable path and the longer run while avoiding actions that would endanger the economic recovery in the near term. the economy is continuing to recover from the financial crisis and recession, but the pace of the recovery has been slower than fomc participants and others had hoped or anticipated when i spoke here last, three years ago. indeed, since the recession trough in 2009, growth in real gdp has averaged only a little more than 2% per year. similarly, the job market has improved over the past three years, but at a slow pace. the unemployment rate, which peaked at 10% in the fall of 2009, has since come down 2%, to just below 8%. this is a welcome decline, but it has taken a long time to achieve the progress, and the unemployment level is still well above its level prior to the onset of the recession and the level that our colleagues an
to it happening. there's also a consensus right and left it would be bad for the economy. so i think that when we are just looking at the tax component, there are certain things that we kev knitly -- definitely need to do. patching the a.m.t. for the first year is big. if we don't get a deal on the rest of the tax cuts until early 2013, i don't think that would be the worst thing for the economy. i do believe that it is kind of a little more of a slope. i do think that there is -- i think that the worst part of the fiscal cliff are going to be avoided, and beyond that i think that both sides if they don't come together then we have a lot more revenue, and then we could do something like tax reform on top of that higher revenue, which would still bring in some revenue, yet at the same time satisfy a lot of republican demands for possibly lower rates. again, we can cross that bridge when we get to it. right now i think we won't -- if there is going to be a deal in this lame duck session, we are not going to know until the very end. host: thank you, gentlemen. appreciate your helping us out with thi
of the biggest issues facing your district? >> in addition to the local economy that impacts the merchant corridors, to many vacant storefronts, transit issues, in every neighborhood we're having a real conversation about how we change, whether we should preserve aspects of the important characters of our neighborhood or think about building new things. there is also a real discussion we're having in many neighborhoods about affordability. i hear from too many tenants in the process of being evicted, homeowners being foreclosed on. we need to think about how all of us can continue to live in a city where the whole world wants to be. >> it is a great place to be. >> it is a great place to be. how do you balance the needs of your district versus the needs of the city as a whole? >> i have an incredibly diverse district. it encompasses north beach and chinatown. we have the city's famous hills. we have for the world comes to work, the financial district's, where the world comes to shop in union square, where the tourists spend time on fisherman's wharf , and the wonderful polk street neighbo
.s. economy and millions of american families have been struggling with unemployment and underemployment, net sales for the walton family has grown more than $70 billion since the start of the great recession. now, a lot of those families in the bottom half struggling with underemployment are in fact walmart workers. a leaked internal document revealed that the base pay at the sam's club stores can be as low as $8 an hour. that's a mere $16,000 a year. with wage increases in drips and drabs as low as 20 or 40 cents per hour. one study found that walmart employees in california were nearly 40% more likely to use public assistance to make ends meet. costing the state's taxpayers $86 million annually. that means people with jobs in that state are still having to turn to the public safety net to get by. because working at walmart is not sustainable employment. if walmart became the standard across all retailers in california, taxpayers would have to subsidize their fellow workers with an additional $410 million a year. yet according to a study by the policy development and advocacy administration
on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they do it, making a point that voters will be looking to see if they can do this in a cooperative manner, whether
. we'll invent it in america and then become a service-based economy. well, here we are, and these new service sector jobs aren't paying off, literally. right now a job in the leisure and hospitality sector averages $13 an hour. that's $27,000 a year, if you work full-time. retail, not much better. average hourly rate, about $16 an hour. this is the average. it takes into account everyone from the store manager to the stock boy. let me show you one tier higher, manufacturing. bringing in almost $24 an hour on average. that's a solid $50,000 a year. that's also the median income for u.s. households. education and health services, these are important jobs for society. workers there earn an average of $24.28 an hour and also around 50 grand a year. again, if you work fulltime. then there's the very top. those are highly educated, highly skilled and highly motivated. census data show the top 20% making six figures, pulling in almost half of the income in the u.s. for this american recovery to work we need to have a middle, a big, prosperous happy middle. don't you think? it has defined gen
and then they looked at taxes, the economy, jobs, and they went to the president. >> what is an emerging trend in technology or how people consumer information that will have implications for 2014? the leading edge? >> that is a good question. the prevalence of people getting their information online has exploded. you look as swing voters and how little they are watching tv, we all had three places you got your news from. now they get their nightly news from 15 sources. jon stewart is an important moment from that. if you are a democratic-leaning woman, you love rachel maddow. getting to those people is harder. they are way more online than anyone. you have to go to where they are. campaigns will spend more and more of their money online than ever before. until it reaches parity with television. >> and you think television will still be big in 2016. >> it is going to be the dominant media but online is going to catch up very quickly. i think it already is catching up for young voters who are looking -- >> within a couple cycles? >> no question. i think the next election is going to have to dec
comprehensive immigration reform. he sees it as a key part to stabilizing the economy, investing in the middle class, not having a subclass of 11 million people that hurt economic revitalization. for him i think it is a piece of the middle class agenda. >> are the other unions working with senator schuman who say they are starting to work on a piece of legislation? >> the majority leader and center schumer. we have some issues with this idea, but we applaud his enthusiasm. we are trying to get him on the steps of key elements that are important to us. >> where do you disagree? >> i think he thinks a national id card is required. we do nothing that needs to be part of the solution to fixing the broken immigration system. >> washington journal continues. host:jim martin n. he will be talking about the future of health care, especially the elements of the affordable care act that are put to place. guest: glad to be here. host: what does it mean in general for older americans now that the election is over? guest: i think things like obamacare, the affordable care act, seniors were opposed to it b
.7%, the highest since july, 2007 and 60.8% in october, 2011. what does it mean for our economy? guest: sometimes there is a direct correlation between what we see in terms of how consumers feel about the economy and what they are willing to spend in terms of the holidays and in general. what we are seeing now especially when you look at the university of michigan reported that the optimism about progress in the job market is offsetting a lot of concern about the fiscal cliff and the possibility of tax increases and cuts to government spending. host: when you look at consumer confidence and sentiment, what factors are in play? guest: a lot of times it has to do with how they feel about their own personal fan -- finances and how they feel about the job market and the prospects of finding employment or losing employment. there is a lot of concern still about the high unemployment levels but the idea that the housing market is improving and the idea that there are a lot more employers that are willing to slowly higher at this point seems to be reassuring consumers that there is some hope for the eco
cartwright. much larger housing it. one-way ticket about this is that the great growing economy in china per capita carbon emissions levels go up about 100% if they stop at the level of wealthy but hybrid -- out by less than 30%. that's a huge difference. whether or not you live in global warming are worried about the price of gas at the pump, we have a lot to gain by china in the building of rather than a. i think the most important thing for america to do in order to encourage a to have it is to get it some urban policies interpret that means stopping our cities as if they are the ugly stepchildren of america and recognize them for the economic heart line, apart a chance -- the heartland for this country. the american dream can only mean a homeowner in the suburb every means rethinking policies that pay for highways with general tax revenues, driving people to drive longer distances, above all honor city schools which are such critical ingredient for urban success in such a critical problem which despite enormous hard work by people language, mayor menino, like the city council, are so far
.s. treasury department is now stopping short of labeling the world's second biggest economy a currency manipulator. the white house is expected now to send the congress a multi-billion-dollar request on the recovery from superstorm sandy. the storm caused an estimated $71 billion in damages in new york and new jersey, and some congressional aides saying the request for funding would likely be at least $11 billion. the move comes as canada gets close to its decision on whether to approve the transaction. the energy companies say discussions with the committee are still in progress, and of course they had to file approval because they have extensive operations in the u.s. gulf of mexico. >>> "the wall street journal" reporting that virtue is emerging as the frontrunner to buy knight capital. they would possibly sell off parts of that business. finally, we can't get away from the story of twinkies. the bakers union of hostess brands wants a bankruptcy judge to appoint a chapter 11 trustee to ensure an orderly winddown. the union is saying it objects the allowing incumbent management to su
convention and james carville reminded me with all the talk about the economy that we don't live in an economy, we live in a society. i care deeply about the society we are creating and i use the word creating on purpose. today community does not happen organically. you have to be very intentional and deliberate about that, and city council is in the midst of a school reassignment process, i have learned quality is subjective, the definition of that. city council is redistricting. i have learned community is subjective. how neighborhoods are defined. i do believe in investing in infrastructure and all those things that would eradicate or mitigate a brain drain, but ultimately, i believe it doesn't matter if we have more affordable housing or better jobs or better schools. if people don't want to live here. that has everything to do with community and the soul of the city. people want to be a part of a city that is diverse and inclusive and welcoming. neighborhood is about social interaction and that is how we build community. in a city like boston that has 22 distinct neighborhoo
cure the economy. the senior editor of "the atlantic" joins us live in the next half hour. he has an interesting perspective. >>> ambassador susan rice heads to capitol hill this morning to mend fences with three republican senators. john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly a at with her information comments made on several networks that played down the role of terrorists in the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, that killed four americans including ambassador chris stevens. rice maintains she made it clear the intelligence information she had at the time was preliminary. senators have threatened to block her nomination if president obama chooses her to be his next secretary of state. >>> and the obama administration responds to the benghazi attack does not get high marks from americans. the results of a new poll out this morning shows a majority of those questioned, 54%, say they are dissatisfied with the administration's handling of the attack. >>> and the body of yasser arafat was exhumed this morning from a mausoleum in the west bank. a team of international scienti
of our abilities to inject new skills into the economy to build jobs that need to be built in america to sustain our growth. it is critical step that we can take now. we have got to realign the corporate tax code. everyone agrees. we just did a survey that includes members of the general public. 70% of the general public believes we need to simplify. we cannot have the tax code that has higher rates and more complexity than anywhere else in the world. we have got to address the system that really hurts- innovation and high technology economy. we did not worry about those when we were doing well, but they are getting in the way of progress we have got to go through the process in a simpler and more logical and efficient way. this is the number one thing thousands of business people said was the biggest barrier to investing in the u.s. we have got to upgrade our infrastructure, but we have got to focus on those that are economically important. we have got to understand the things that are driving up the cost of doing business. we know what those are, but we need a plan for going forward
. caller: i have an idea for straightening out things are going on with the economy and some -- everything else. we have to separate our federal employees -- state, federal, and local -- and our health care workers from the private sector. if we do this, we can concentrate on mortgages for 6% interest for all the federal and -- and some health care workers. in 30 years we would have $24 trillion. 45 million, 54 trillion -- host: where are you getting the numbers from? caller: because, if we take the war that we have now, $104 billion, and we put it into mortgages at 6% interest rate they would come out to 70 -- $17,000 a year. 20 million employees. which means they would be self sufficient for the rest of their lives, which means you would have 166,000 per employee in interest that would cover the employee you got this -- that is working, the employee does is retired, and his benefits. which would cut down the deficit, cut down just about everything you could think of perry taxes in half, property taxes would be cut. you would have a whole new system. guest: there are certainly a whole ran
people are flying. another reason is because of the economy, some people are saying i'm going to hold off in terms of booking a flight especially because fares are not dropping. because there's limited capacity. the airlines have been able to hold fares at a fairly consistent level. they are down according to aa compared to last year. still, you won't find too many bargains unless you're looking for last minute deals to nontraditional places. one other thing, guys, as we take a look at rental car stocks, you've heard a lot of stories over the last couple of days. it's true. if you were looking to rent a car in the northeastern united states, which some people do during the holiday weekend, good luck because most of them are already spoken for. this is the carryover effect from superstorm sandy. so many cars were damaged, destroyed during the storm. as a result, rental cars have been tight for some time in the northeastern united states. and that's the case this weekend. a lot of people, believe it or not, guys, they do like to rent a car in order to make the trip of 300 or 400 miles. this
's thanksgiving pallad. we will show share how it happened. >> steve: want to see where our economy is going. look back to 1937 and franklin roosevelt and stewart varney will explain how history could repeat himself as he enters studio e. good morning to you, stewart. ♪ ♪ ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant with thermacare heatwraps. thermacare works differently. it's the only wrap with patented heat cells that penetrate deep to relax, soothe, and unlock tight muscles. for up to 16 hours of relief, try thermacare. now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personal attention. which is why we are proud to partner with health care professionals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that's a very nice cake! ohh! [ giggles ] [ male announcer ] humana thanks the physicians, nurses, hospitals, pharmacists and other health professionals who helped us achieve the highest average star rating among national medicare companies... and become the first and only national medicare
and how well we have done educating the people to take their place in the economy and i would hope whatever agenda comes forward we have an agenda that is deeply focused on adult learning, adult education, community college and finding more ways for people to constructively entered the economy. >> i would concur with many of those points. i am grateful i live in a state that has the governor in deval patrick, living in a country with president barack obama. i am vigorously supporting him. creating a better access to educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating other disparities. the thing that is important we not obsess about, 99% or 47% and remember there are people behind those percentages. people who have been struggling and living in poverty. talking about the shrinking middle class, who are they joining? i want a president and a governor and a mayor that believes in making critical investments in physical infrastructure and in people's that supports the role that everyone has to play in the economy including kid putting people on a path to self sufficient lea
to our gross domestic product. money we would have had added to the economy of this country but for our failure to educate these kids. so now where we are is we're in a place where we're playing catch-up with countries that used to crave to be like us. it's so bad now that while our university systems are still where they should be in terms of reputation and attainment, no one really from other countries wants to send their kids over here to go to our k-12 schools. they do that there, and then they say, okay, we'll try to send them to some ivy league school or some good college in the states. and we're at the point now where we need to seriously look at what is it going to take to change that dynamic. well, you know, in recent days we've heard about the teachers' strike, and i think that the big challenge we have is we put ourselves in these partisan boxes, and we force people when we talk about education to take sides. and you know the side that's never adequately represented in these discussions? these kids. so i just posted on my blog, i said, okay, how will a teacher strike in chica
. >> they are hurting themselves and the other people, the drivers, the economy. i mean, keep on working. do what you can do. >> reporter: a spokesperson for the port said thanksgiving week is one of their busiest times of the year with trucks moving merchandise for the upcoming holiday season and yesterday's strike only mind the delays worse. but the spokesman told me operations at the port are slowly returning to normal. alex savidge, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> in about an hour, one suspect in a violent string of crimes last week will face a judge for the first time. 26-year-old jonathan wilbanks faces charges of murder, attempted murder and attempted robbery. he and another man still on the loose are accused of four robberies, a deadly attempted carjacking and a shooting that injured an officer friday night. the two were seen on surveillance video at the 7-11 where a man was shot and killed because he could not give up his car. a $20,000 reward is being offered for anyone with information leading to the arrest of the second man. >>> the heavy rain has moved out of the bay area. but still some moistu
care law coming from folks saying it's such a huge driver of the economy if fully implemented it has to be up for negotiation. house speaker john boehner wrote an op-ed. the president's health care law, massive expensive unworkable at a time when the national debt sees the size of our economy, and we can't afford it and we can't afford to leave it intact and clear that the law has stay on the table as both parties discuss ways to solve our nagsal debt challenge. where is it going. >> nowhere, he's right about everything he writes about, but it's a disaster, no way it's going to be stopped. it was an issue that the country decided this election, obama staked a claim and he won. the supreme court was the only other way it was going to be stopped. it wasn't stopped, it's not going to be stopped now. and the idea that to oversight committees in the house could stop this is absurd. look, i think it's right. it's going to be disastrous and should be cut back or dismantled, but elections have consequences and this is one. so, i think it's not on the table and republicans can pretend it is,
gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. not in this economy. we also have zero free time, and my dad moving in. so we went to fidelity. we looked at our family's goals and some ways to help us get there. they helped me fix my economy, the one in my house. now they're managing my investments for me. and with fidelity, getting back on track was easier than i thought. call or come in today to take control of your personal economy. get one-on-one help from america's retirement leader. >> welcome back. attorney general eric older in the hot seat this time for the handling of the david petraeus affair and the decision not to inform the president about this until after the election. >> we conducted the investigation and we made the determination as we were going through the matter that there was not a threat to national security. had we made the determination that a threat to national security existed we would have made that known to the president and appropriate members on the hill. but was the president really kept in the dark about a potential national security risk
because it's good for the economy. without thinking about what it does for those of us who are looking to find homes in america . [applause] >> please. >> these guys did such a great job of playing up the issues. again this going to tell a story. before i do that, because i am from washington and because it's halloween and because i have three children, all of some of the church retreat to my will report year that the most popular cost and that is completely is binder full of women. >> what did the selling custom look like? you put your arms in the binder. it's like not at jack in the box . pops out of a little fuller think. said we were bell in washington. very creative. i'm just going to tell the story that inspired me to read my book. this began in 2009. the book is based on an atlanta store which cannot in 2010. basically i have been vacationing for a long time which is a pretty prosperous working class town. when you went there. it seemed like it or not that many men around. it seemed like a was not seen them in church, at the fairgrounds, driving down the street, trucks, during c
$2.30 trillion of our gross domestic product, money we could have added to this economy. we are now in a place where we are playing catch-up with countries that used to crave to be like us. it is so bad now that while our university systems are still where they should be in terms of reputation and attainment, no one from other countries want to send their kids over here to our k-12 schools. they do that there and then it they will say, will try some ivy league school. we need to seriously look at, what is it going to take to change that dynamic. in recent days, we have heard about the teachers' strike. i think that the big challenge we have, if we put ourselves in these partisan boxes and we force people when we talk about education to take sides -- the side that is never adequately represented in these discussions is kids. i just posted on my blog, i said, okay, how will it teachers' strike in chicago help kids? i got all these responses from people who love teachers, people who are mad at teachers. i had 40 people just immediately respond. no one answered that question. they start
is going on with our economy, that really tears my heart up. tax me, i don't care. >> bill: you don't care if you paid more taxes? >> i pay my hung gus amount of taxes. >> bill: sure, so do i. >> so do you. >> right. >> bill: do you want to pay 40, 45% which would take you income redistributors. >> if it would help, i would not mind it the thing is it won't help. the more money they get the more they will spend. >> bill: i have got to see it's doing some good. you have a foundation and i have a foundation. we give money privately to those we know. wounded warriors, fishers out. chuck, thanks for coming and good to see you again. >> thank you, bill. >> bill: would you call yourself a conservative now. >> i have become conservative on, you know, because of the position that we're in right now. >> financial position? things like that. >> certainly financial. you know, i have always said if you were going to wear badge sheriff. >> of the world? >> yes. the of the world then you better act like wyatt earth. >> that puts you in the minority in hollywood. >> i guess so. >> bill: fear on some acto
to make homes more and more and more expensive. because it's good for the economy. without thinking about what it does for those of us who are looking to find a home in america. [applause] >> since these guys did such a great shuffling of issues i think i'm going to tell a story. but before did i just want to say that because i'm from washington and because it's halloween and because i have three children, all from love to trick or treat, i will report here that the most popular cautioned that has come up lately is binders full of women. [laughter] spent what does this hollow and caution look like? you put your arms in the binder, and it's like sort of nodded jack-in-the-box. it's like a jack lalanne in the box. who said we're dolan washington? i'm going to tell a story that inspired me to write my book. this began in 2000. the book is based on a story came out in 2010, and basically i had been vacationing and have a longtime which is a pretty process working class down come and one year i went there and it seemed like they were not that many minaret piercing like i was in a church, the f
education, community colleges and finding more ways for people to constructively enter the economy. >> and, counselor. >> yes, i would concur with many of those points. i am grateful that i live in a state that has a governor in deval patrick and living in a country with president barack obama. i'm vigorously supporting him for all the reasons you just stated, in creating better access to both educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating all those other disparities. i just think it's really important that we not obsess about the 99% or the 47% and just remember that there are people behind all those percentages. and people who have been struggling and people living in poverty. we keep talking about the shrinking middle class, who are they joining? and so i want a president and a governor and a mayor that believes in making those critical investments in physical infrastructure and in people that supports the role that everyone has to play in the economy including getting people in poverty on a pathway to self-sufficiency. that is just as important. >> round of appl
to wreck the economy. and i think there are a lot of republicans that are saying what a few of us were saying after the election. bill kristol said it. so tell me again, why are we fighting and risking our majorities, protecting billionaires that are hedge fund guys who are paying 14% tax rates? >> walk two blocks from this street, fifth avenue between this building and 57th street, and the storefronts on fifth avenue. anybody who can go into those storefronts and purchase things in those storefronts are not going to be damaged by these tax reforms that we've been talking about. they're not going to be damaged. >> by the way, the storefronts aren't going to be damaged by raising capital gains rates from 15% to 20%. i want everybody to be rich. i'm a capitalist. i want everybody to make $250,000. barack obama says that's rich. whatever. i want everybody -- i love people being successful in this country, but again, if you're making billions of dollars, again, there's something immoral, mika, about these people paying 14%, 15%, 16% on their taxes because the tax rates are the way they are
after manufacturing surveys from the world's biggest economies raised hopes for improving global growth. >>> facebook wants to stop letting users vote on changes to its private policies. the social network is concerned about the quantity versus quality of feedback generated by the current setup. the company says users will still be able to weigh in during a seven-day comment period. >>> the u.s. post office is hoping to cash in on the season's bounty of online shopping with same-day package delivery. same-day. the expedited service will be tested in san francisco next month and then if it's successful, the program will expand to other big cities like boston, new york and chicago. >>> most americans celebrated the thanksgiving holiday with family, friends and some football. about 68,000 of them are far from home. and even though new york jets played like turkeys, the team did a very nice thing for some of our soldiers in afghanistan. >> reporter: it's thanksgiving in afghanistan and these u.s. service members are celebrate with some football and the new york jets who have donated jerseys
of the modern economy? >> it is available. we can do better with it. they are facts like completion rates for the gi bill education are not as high as they ought to be. we can structure some of those programs better so that individuals who start school have the support mechanisms to finish an associate's degree or bachelor's degree if that is their goal. we can do better at that. there are well-intentioned programs that are not quite efficient or effective to this point as i hope there will be in the future. >> the university of iowa offers in-state tuition for returning veterans. i said to the president -- what is the impact on the campus? she said -- beyond my ability to describe it -- we have 200 of them here. they lifted the entire campus. as someone who went to the university of iowa -- i could have used that kind of mentoring and leadership at one point. we do not have to go do that again. paul, we talked about that. [laughter] that is value added when these young men and women come back and enter an academic or training program of some kind. >> i could not agree more. at my alma ma
of systemic risk to the economy, then that is a proper, you know, the fundamental proper role of regulation to make sure that is in some way firewall. .. marc friedman author of the new book, "the big shift" navigating the new stage beyond midlife talks about the need for better social programs and savings plans for people in their 50's, 60's and 70's who want meaningful and sustaining work later in life. from the commonwealth club of california in san francisco, this is 45 minutes. >> good evening and welcome to the meeting of the common wealth club of california. i am chair the clubs grown ups for amend your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and we invite everyone to listen to us on line at commonwealth club.org. now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. marc freedman is ceo and founder of encore.org, a nonprofit organization working to promote encore careers. second acts for the greater good. he spearheaded the creation of the experience core, now one of america's largest nonprofit national service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose
economies in the world. the u.s. and china share a lot of interests and most importantly people in both countries share an interest in for example dealing with climate change. something that neither government is not the chinese are u.s. government are prepared to move strongly enough to change. when we talk about pivoting in the context of sending the troops, that doesn't help when we are trying to do with what should we be doing about climate change. i think what we really need is a pivot away from the military being the centerpiece of our diplomatic shift and a shift towards engagement with people at an entirely different level. >> host: a recent study by the brand company in the project for the air force talked about u.s. overseas military presence and the strategic choices that the government has to make. one of the comments in that report says, the u.s. has to decide whether china and the united states should rely primarily on u.s. space forces to respond to global crises and conflicts keeping only a small group of presence to reassure allies and partners. such a choice would be b
the imagination of the individual entepreneur. we had economies that went back many, many miennia and were successful until 1492. john: indians had a form of property rights before white settlers came here and mess that up. some indians actually owned the salmon streams. they manage those streams so that they let the larger salmon go up to spawn. the result is that even today those streams have larger salmon and the streams that were held in common owned by everyone and hence managed by no one. john: not an individual indian, but a plan would on the stream. why today would they still have more salmon? >> that just goes back to what was superior management over a century ag. and at the same time i should know we are mismanaging our salmon stocks by chasing them around the ocean, open ocean and over harvesting salmon and many other species. we could learn from what the native americans did. john: you say you can see the private property difference by driving through some indian land >> it is fascinating to drive through the reservation in the west. recently i drove through the crow indian re
and others, are they getting the kind of training they need in this economy? >> i think it's available. i think we can do better with it. there are some facts like completion rates for gi bill education are not as high as they ought to be. i think we can structure some of those programs a little better so individuals who start school have the kind of support mechanisms to be built to finish either an associate's degree or bachelor's degree, if that is their goal. but we can do better at that. there are well-intentioned programs that are not quite as efficient or effective at this point. >> the wharton school of business and the university of iowa, the university of iowa offers in-state tuition to returning veterans. i ask the president what's the impact on the campus? he said beyond my ability to describe. i could have used that kind of mentoring and leadership at one. -- one point as a graduate of iowa. when these young and women come back and enter an academic or training program of some kind, we need this. >> i cannot agree more. city college of new york, mike alma mater, we had a spec
.s. economy could certainly use a boost of holiday shopping. so what's the outlook? >> well, there are some good signs early. one of them comes from the national association of retailers. now, their projections tend to be pretty conservative. all the same. this organization believes that as far as retailers are concerned, it's going to be a pretty good 2012 holiday shopping season. we expect sales to rise 4% this year a little lower than last year. we really believe that consumers are feeling a lot more confident this year. now if you are looking for a segment to grow even faster than 4 hers projection try online already. ibm research signature it was up 17% on thanksgiving day. 20% already for this holiday shopping season, john? >> it turns out some of those black friday deals are not all they are cracked up to be. >> some of them, according to decide incorporated which part nerd up with a news corps fellow organization the "wall street journal" they took a look at some of these bargains and came to the same conclusion that shoppers came to that they are really deals. >> sometimes i think
on rebuilding the middle class and strengthening our economy by investing in jobs, not cuts. on the other side, conservatives say it's not a game changer because from unions, this is really nothing new. >> the fact they are publicly saying what they have been privately saying is helpful the american people understand where obama's intransigence comes from, but nothing's changed. >> they negotiated details this week of the grand fiscal cliff compromise that democrats and republicans hope to reach. lawmakers back in town neex week, and there's a meeting loosely scheduled in the white house against top democrats and republicans in congress with president obama. dagen? dagen: thank you so much, happy thanksgiving, my man. down in washington, d.c., but here in studio with my, monica crowely, author of "what the bleep just happened?" how do they have influence over the white house and represent in terms of the private job market a tiny sliver of employees in the country? >> it really is incredible. we've seen a hemorrhaging away from the many, many past decades. you're right to say their influence i
amounts of money back into the economy. the energy picture looks a lot different than it did a few years ago. host: this natural gas boom that we have, why do you say we are in danger of blowing it? guest: there was a large amount of investment made in recent years to extract that gas. we are looking at different ways of using it. both the price and supply in the long term may be more constrained. guest: -- host: you also argue the problem of the aging energy trend. guest: is the transition to gas. this year a large portion of the energy produced in the united states, almost 50% is going to be produced by natural gas. a big change. a long-term evolution that we have been going through. coal-fired plants have been taken off line this year in record numbers. that has been made up by more utilization of existing natural gas plants. that is a good thing for the grid, it creates a lot of flexibility. the challenge that we have, as anyone living in the eastern part of the united states has recognized, is that the grid itself is very susceptible to storms and other kinds of power interruptions
a careful look at contemporary theory of political economy. you are going to have to bear with me for 10 minutes or so and i promise we will get back to soldiers but we can appreciate the real significance of this rhetoric of romantic patriotism in less wafers get a good grasp on the serious scientific thinking that lay behind it. informal theory, freedom to love, marry and reproduce, became essential elements of both american liberty and american power. now americans in the era of 1812 were themselves actually very well-versed in population theory. regular methodical government accounts for all the inhabitants meant that even average people had access to basic facts that they nation's population strengths. from the time of the first national census in 1792 the second which was in 1800, the nation's numbers expanded them approximately 3.9 million, to about 5.3 million they continued rising sharply, reaching 7.2 million by the third official census in 1810. so in total, the nation's numbers increased nearly twofold in just two decades. these official figures were reported widely in region
-pinching scrooge when they wanted beneficent santa claus. >> we had katrina. we had a down economy. now we got the spill. you can't tell me one person that has not suffered. why don't you open up the purse strings? >> here's my answer. [applause] don't trust my words. my words--you've heard a lot of talk. let's just see, over the next few weeks and months, have i delivered on my promise to help people in mississippi? >> ever since the deepwater horizon blew, it was clear that this was a disaster in the making. the fishing industry came to a stop. tourism was wrecked. the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands, anyone who was dependent on these waters, were in deep jeopardy. under pressure from the federal government, bp agreed to create a victims compensation fund. both bp and the white house wanted one man, ken feinberg, to administer it. >> i felt that if asked, i should step up and try and help as best i can. >> what is it about ken feinberg that makes him the nation's arbiter of impossible decisions? >> i think there's something that experience brings to the table in terms of getting these p
, the end of the blockade, or the easing of the blockade, that's crippled the economy now for four years, and the israelis want security, obviously, for because of the hamas rockets hit for the first time as far as tel aviv and jerusalem. so there's motive to move forward. the question is, is there the will. that's always been the issue. >> both sides have the motive to move forward, as you say. both sides also claiming victory in this small skirmish over the last several days. want to play a sound bite from the leader of hamas who spoke in gaza city. >> translator: the victory of gaza is a solid truth, not a phenomenon. the era of egypt and the region has changed, and america has now beginning to learn a new and listen to a new language. >> so is he right? is there a new era dawning in the middle east? and what does it mean for the u.s.? >> well, there's clearly a new era dawning in the middle east. and we're still trying to figure out what the new order is going to look like, as are many people on the ground. but both sides to a certain degree can claim a degree of victory here. hamas
with the bad for the economy and would be a source of social conflict. so we created a vast policy innovation called the g.i. bill. i think we need something that is an encore bill to help tens of millions who are crossing different terrain. it's not geographic. it's not from military service disability and life but it's really a stage in life that has no name, that has few pathways and institutions, but in the same way that we are deeply invested in those soldiers finding their footing. the same is true of all these millions and millions of people today who are in this period that is between life resembling retirement and old age. i would like to see us do it in a way that promotes social mobility. this wonderful example, the troops and teachers program which helps, to go back to the g.i. bill analogy, would help mostly sergeants coming back from the gulf war, moving the ball for school teaching. it was created by an 86-year-old retired history professor at washington university who watched a youth account of soldiers coming back from the first iraq war who were having trouble getting their
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